0 Items $0.00

Archives

You are here

  1. One of my favorite songs over the past several years is “The Rising” by Bruce Springsteen.  A song from the depths of despair that speaks of rebirth, resurrection, and forgiveness. During this time when quite rightly we are anxious for our health and well-being, we are also staring down the very real possibility that the individual businesses and concerns that we have poured so much effort into, may themselves be decimated by this pandemic and plummeting economy...

  2. We have all been hearing about the home-schooling struggles of parents of younger school-age kids. The fact that my kids are 17 and 19 is one of the things I feel grateful for during this time of quarantine. I don’t have to figure out how to teach them during “school time” and then entertain them the rest of the time. High school and college age kids are easy in comparison, but there are still challenges and golden opportunities to help older kids survive and thrive during this time...

  3. Culture and its impact on employees and organizational success cannot be overstated. The behavioral definition of culture is, patterns of behavior that are reinforced or punished by people and systems over time. Since all business is behavior, this definition is especially important for understanding your culture and how it impacts overall performance...

  4. CEO’s are faced with many challenges, but what are the most common? The Predictive Index released a report outlining top CEO concerns. Fortunately, each of these challenges can be successfully addressed through the proven application of behavioral science. Even better, behavioral solutions work alongside an organization’s existing systems and processes so that enhanced performance is sustainable and persists over time.  ..

  5. Change is necessary in order for organizations to evolve successfully. Change can also bring with it a volcano of emotions from those who are affected. Surprise, confusion, and even fear are common responses from employees after learning about an upcoming change. If these reactions are not addressed appropriately, it is nearly impossible to produce the transformation that is intended by implementing the change. How leadership addresses and minimizes concerns to obtain critical support can be as simple as explaining the why...

  6. Think of discretionary effort as the more in the “I got more” GEICO commercials.  Discretionary Effort is defined as performance that is above and beyond the minimum requirements of a job. More importantly, the discretionary effort of employees is earned, by the organization and by leaders, in how they interact with employees.  In a recent article, the authors looked at how rapport-building behaviors influence performance a..

  7. It has probably happened to you, but you just didn’t know it by name: Ghosting. Ghosting is the act of actively ignoring or dodging attempts to be contacted through various mediums—e.g., texts, phone calls, WhatsApp, LinkedIn…you get the idea. In its simplest form, ghosting is NOT responding. In the science of human behavior, ghosting is a good example of another cool term: Extinction...

  8. “I told you to do it this way.” “Weren’t you in the training where we learned how to do this correctly?” “Why do you keep doing this?” “I thought I was clear about how I wanted this done.”..

  9. A failed change initiative is costly—wasted time and money on failed implementation, lost ROI on the projected results of the change, and decreased trust from employees in leadership’s ability to bring about effective change. Given these avoidable losses, leadership should look for and remove the following three roadblocks to prevent a failed change initiative...

  10. Language is truly a double-edged sword.  Language allows us to cooperate, plan, coordinate, describe the future, talk about the past, and it even allows us to describe interactions between the environment and behavior so that a person does not need to experience direct consequences to learn (e.g...

Pages