0 Items $0.00

Archives

You are here

  1. Most of us have had the opportunity to work under great, and unfortunately not so great, leaders. More than likely when you worked with great leaders you delivered high levels of discretionary effort and enjoyed the work you did. Under poor leaders, you might have found yourself increasingly unmotivated and burdened by the work. ..

  2. About 11 years ago, my father underwent successful open-heart surgery at age 74. The surgeons completed a triple by-pass and valve replacement...

  3. Leadership requires confidence in one’s ability to make good decisions. Yet that confidence does not guarantee quality in the decision making. Sometimes confidence isn’t well founded. The dark side of confidence is arrogance, and arrogance can lead to quick decisions based on narrow thinking and deeply rooted perceptions...

  4. When I was in college, I worked in a food distribution warehouse loading trucks. It was backbreaking work. We would load five trailers per day—each load weighing about 25,000 pounds!..

  5. Every business goal is driven by human behavior. It follows then that your employees’ performance—their behavior and results—is the most important output of your role as a leader. Considering that your coaching time and energy are limited, it’s especially important to identify the behaviors that will bring the most benefit to them and the business. When you identify the most impactful work behaviors while prioritizing an important concept derived from behavioral science, the behavioral cusp, the outcome is that much greater...

  6. No, the image above is not an iStock photo nor one taken from a safety magazine. This is a live action shot I took from the window of a hotel where I was conducting a Safety Leadership workshop for a client...

  7. In one of my recent blogs, Leaders Can Make or Break Engagement, I provided concrete steps leaders can take to move from managing to coaching.  This topic proves to be a very important one so it seems only fitting to dig deeper into the science of behavior to explain how poor management practices can destroy employee engagement...

  8. Many times in the course of working with clients, they hit a point of realization about using a scientific approach to behavior on the job, and it sometimes sounds like this: “You mean I have to do THIS for EVERY behavior?”  The short answer is yes and no. Let me explain...

  9. And neither is most so-called behavioral economics Despite being the first American to win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, Paul Samuelson famously stated, “Economics has never been a science—and it is even less now than a few years ago.” It is my opinion that this statement still holds true today. Economics has been called the dismal science. Once you get to understand it, you may not find it so dismal, but you don’t find it much of a science either...

  10. In Gallup’s most recent State of American Workplace Report, they indicate that only one-third of the American workforce is actively engaged in the organization that employs them.  An even more alarming result of the study found that 51% of employees are actively looking for a new job.  This means that in the average company, a significant proportion of the workforce is not only underperforming, but they are looking to..

Pages