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  1. All projects and change efforts involve behavioral risk. They require people to start doing some things or to do things differently. When sustained behavior change is a requirement, those responsible for the new behaviors must feel compelled to do so, know specifically what to do, and know how to do it. They must also receive more positive reinforcement for those new behaviors than for any old habits or workarounds that compete with the new behaviors. It might sound simple, but as the number of people involved in the change effort grows, the risk grows...

  2. In the book Measure of a Leader, the authors state, “The best predictors of leadership are found in the behaviors of the leader’s followers.” Measuring a leader by the success of the people he or she leads is a powerful indicator of that person’s true leadership...

  3. It is quite likely that even the best MBA programs in the world are missing out on preparing their candidates with the one thing that will ensure they enter the real world with proven, effective leadership skills; the one thing that guarantees, if applied correctly and consistently, sustainable, positive results. That one thing is a clear understanding of the science of human behavior and how to apply its principles and methods successfully in the workplace. To be clear, this doesn’t just apply to MBA candidates; it extends to anyone in a management position...

  4. Based on the positive response to my blog on Increasing Meaningful Behaviors, I thought it worthwhile to extend the discussion. As you now know, values can play an important role in our lives and help guide us through the environmental “noise” we interact with on a daily basis. Without deliberately using your core values as a way to find direction or purpose in life, the world around you may be actively encouraging behaviors you find inconsistent with who you want to be. In our current social and economic envir..

  5. I’m guessing that many of you have begun to settle into a rhythm while working and leading remotely as we navigate a work world turned upside down by the pandemic. Even as we are adjusting to the current state, everyone in your organization is facing considerable uncertainly. Whether we acknowledge it or not, our behavior is affected by what happens around us...

  6. During this phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Deborah Birx of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, have repeatedly advocated behavior change as mitigating steps to reduce the rate of infections in the population.  "There's no magic bullet. There's no magic vaccine or therapy. It's just behaviors."—Dr. Deborah Birx, White House Press Conference, 3/31/20...

  7. For most of us in the US and for many throughout the world, our lives have been turned upside down by stay-at-home orders. We’ve lost access to many of our favorite places to spend our time.  For me personally, I have lost the ability to be onsite with my clients, to access my gym, to eat at my favorite restaurants, to go climbing, and to participate in my social group.  I am sure you are experiencing similar disruption to your preferred activities.  From a behavior science perspective, what we have lost are sources of reinforcement.  ..

  8. It is hard to concentrate right now. Really hard. Kids at home, breaking news lighting up our phones every few hours, concerns over family and friends, supply chain disruptions, stock market worries…whew!  Even the most dedicated workers are having trouble staying focused on the job at hand. If you are managing others during this unprecedented time, your approach also requires a different strategy. Management as usual is unlikely to be successful given you and your employees are not as connected...

  9. One of my favorite songs over the past several years is “The Rising” by Bruce Springsteen.  A song from the depths of despair that speaks of rebirth, resurrection, and forgiveness. During this time when quite rightly we are anxious for our health and well-being, we are also staring down the very real possibility that the individual businesses and concerns that we have poured so much effort into, may themselves be decimated by this pandemic and plummeting economy...

  10. We have all been hearing about the home-schooling struggles of parents of younger school-age kids. The fact that my kids are 17 and 19 is one of the things I feel grateful for during this time of quarantine. I don’t have to figure out how to teach them during “school time” and then entertain them the rest of the time. High school and college age kids are easy in comparison, but there are still challenges and golden opportunities to help older kids survive and thrive during this time...

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